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4 Rogers Street
Spring Hill, QLD, 4000
Australia

+61 7 3391 2504

Brisbane Dentist - excellence in general and aesthetic dentistry with Drs Amy Daley, Leila Haywood, UQ graduates with 20 years of experience in Spring Hill, Brisbane

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dentistry life at Brisbane Smile Boutique

The life and times of our dental practice, up to date news in dentistry and celebrations, happy moments in dentistry. Our blog outlines dentistry life at Brisbane Smile Boutique in Spring Hill in inner city Brisbane

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What are Porcelain Veneers

Leila Haywood

Porcelain veneers are very fine tooth-coloured porcelain covers which are seamlessly bonded to the front of prepared teeth. They are a more conservative treatment than a crown and can be used if the tooth is strong and healthy. 

They can be suitable for people who have very misaligned teeth, and for those who did not wish to have braces or Invisalign orthodontic treatment. 

If teeth are discoloured, worn, or chipped away, porcelain veneers may be a treatment option where the tooth can be rebuilt exactly as it ought to for best aesthetics and durability, and allows the dentist to rebuild your smile with a greater capacity to change the shade and shape of the teeth.

 

Porcelain veneers placed by Leila Haywood in 2013

Porcelain veneers placed by Leila Haywood in 2013

Advantages: 

 

1. Feels just like the tooth 

2. Strong, durable and stable

3. The shape of the teeth and colour can be changed 

4. Finishes like glass, so it is stain free

5. 5 year laboratory warranty

6. Takes 2 weeks to have made, and temporaries are made 

7. They can be made to be extremely thin, down to 0.2 mm 

8. Precision fit and made by master ceramist in Australia

 

Disadvantages:

 

1.  Veneers mostly require some preparation of the tooth surface, which means these are irreversible

2. Costly 

3. Time - temporaries are placed for 2 weeks while our ceramist makes the veneer

4. Very rarely they can chip

5. Eventually a veneer will likely need to be replaced, they are very strong and long lasting, but may not last a life time

6. Excellent home care is needed, as well as routine checkups and professional cleans each 6 months to monitor veneers 

7.  Rarely veneers can debond or pop off - wear and tear on a veneer can be minimised by wearing a protective night guard or splint

COLA DRINKS AND TEETH

Leila Haywood

A 375ml can of Coke has 40 grams of sucrose - a can a day adds up to 15 kg of sugar consumption in a year.
The sugar content of Cola drinks contributes to dental decay.
The acid contributes to dental decay, as well as the tooth structure softening and dissolving away, in a process known as 'dental erosion', which can strip the enamel off the teeth, and expose the yellowy softer dentine underneath. This can lead to sensitivity, and the teeth are more vulnerable to developing cavities.
The caffeine causes less saliva flow, which normally washes over the teeth to help to protect them.
There is concern about there being an interaction with Cola beverages and calcium in the body, with the drinks being linked to osteoporosis.
The acid, in combination with the sugar, changes the bacteria in the plaque that forms in the mouth.
Caffeine energy drinks and cola drinks are a mix of sugar, acid and caffeine which can cause catastrophic damage to teeth, not to mention the effects on weight, and general health.

COLA AND TEETH

About gingivitis

Leila Haywood

HOW IS GINGIVITIS TREATED?

The best cure for gingivitis is to catch it early. This is especially true for people who are prone to developing periodontal disease, a bacterial infection where the bone is eaten away from around the roots of the teeth causing them to become loose and wobbly. This happens to around a quarter of the adult population.

Gingivitis is the earliest, mildest stage of gum disease. At this stage, the gums may become red and slightly swollen and they may bleed easily. Most people experience very little discomfort on a day-to-day basis, at this stage, so they may not bother to see the dentist. Even if you see your dentist regularly, schedule an extra appointment as soon as possible if you notice redness, swelling or bleeding in your gums, even if it isn't painful. Early intervention is the key to combatting the infection before it becomes serious.

Some medical conditions make you more likely to develop gingivitis. If you are pregnant, have diabetes, are being treated for cancer, or having other hormonal changes, you are at increased risk.  Even if you are perfectly healthy, you should still pay attention to your oral health and see your dentist at the early signs of gingivitis.

Your genes may be against you. Research has shown that approximately 30 percent of the human population overall is at increased risk for gum disease independent of other health factors.

The best intervention for gingivitis is twice yearly professional dental cleaning. Then it’s up to you to maintain a consistent oral health care routine of twice-daily toothbrushing and daily flossing. In addition, your dental hygienist or dentist may recommend a mouth rinse as part of an early intervention to help keep plaque at bay,  although this is usually only if the condition of the gums is exceptionally bad.

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MY GUMS BLEED WHEN I BRUSH. IS THIS A PROBLEM?

We would be very concerned if another part of our body was bleeding when we touched it.  Bleeding from the gums is a sign that there is disease either in the gums around the teeth, or the bone that supports it.  In some cases, with professional scaling and cleaning, careful monitoring of the gums and modifications to home care, the gums can become healthy again. In other cases, where there is irreversible and extreme damage, extensive dental treatment may be required with your dentist, dental hygienist and specialist care.

Do I need a mouthrinse?

Leila Haywood

Mouth rinses are either cosmetic or therapeutic

  • Therapeutic mouthwashes can be purchased over-the-counter and may be recommended by your dentist to reduce or control plaque, gingivitis, bad breath, and tooth decay
  • Children younger than the age of 6 should not use a mouthwash because they may swallow the liquid and is not required for a child
  •  No child should be given an alcohol containing mouth rinse. 
  • Using a mouthwash does not replace the need for optimal brushing and flossing. 

A cosmetic mouthwash might taste pleasant and temporarily control bad breath but has no use beyond this.  Therapeutic mouthrinses have active ingredients which may control or reduce conditions like bad breath, gingivitis, plaque, and tooth decay.

Active ingredients may include the following:

  • cetylpyridinium chloride 
  • chlorhexidine - can help to control infections, plaque buildup and gum disease
  • essential oils
  • fluoride - proven to prevent decay
  • peroxide - present in whitening mouthrinses
dental mouth wash

 

Mouthrinses should not be used as a replacement for daily brushing and flossing, but may be helpful for some people to address certain conditions as per the below:

Dry Socket is an infection that can occur following a tooth extraction and chlorhexidine based mouthrinses, without the use of antibiotics, has been shown to be effective, to reduce the chances of an infection. There may be minor reactions to chlorhexidine use, including brown staining of teeth and an altered taste. The Swiss brand Curasept has anti staining technology added to it

Bad Breath

Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) cause bad breath from the breakdown of food, and the bacteria associated with dental disease.  Cosmetic mouthwashes can temporarily mask bad breath with their pleasant flavour, but do not have an actual effect on the bacteria or VSCs.  Mouthwashes with therapeutic agents like antimicrobials, may be effective for bad breath, however it should be prescribed by a dental professional, in case there is active decay, an infected tooth or periodontal disease which needs to be addressed with some treatment or for preventive measures.


Plaque and Gingivitis
When used in mouthwashes, antimicrobial ingredients like cetylpyridinium, chlorhexidine, and essential oils may reduce the plaque levels and gum disease when combined with daily brushing and flossing. Chlorhexidine has been found to be better for plaque control than essential oils, however both may cause brown staining of the teeth and any restorations.


Tooth Decay
Fluoride promotes remineralisation and a Cochrane  review found that with regular use there is a reduction in tooth decay.

Topical Pain Relief
Mouthwashes with topical local anesthetics such as lidocaine, benzocaine/butamin/tetracaine hydrochloride, dyclonine hydrochloride, or phenol may provide pain relief, for example for an ulcer


Whitening
Mouthwashes with carbamide peroxide or hydrogen peroxide  among the active ingredients may reduce extrinsic staining of the teeth. 


Xerostomia
Xerostomia is a reduced amount of saliva which protect the teeth and the tissues in the mouth, which increases the risk of caries, and a fluoride mouthwash may reverse the risk. Mouthwashes containing enzymes or cellulose derivatives have the composition and feel of saliva.

Oral Cancer Concern
Alcohol consumption is a known risk factor for head and neck cancers and there has been some debate about whether the use of alcohol containing mouthwash  increases the risk.

Conclusion

With regular dental checks, hygiene appointments with the dental hygienist and bitewing x-rays each 2 years, your dental health can be monitored closely by your dental professional. With meticulous home care and care from your dental professional, use of an electric toothbrush with a pressure sensor and timer for 2 minutes morning and night, a health diet, and daily flossing there is no need for the average person to use a mouthrinse with any regularity. For mouth ulcers that heal within 3 weeks, the use of warm salt water rinses should be adequate. For severe periodontal disease or bleeding gums, Curasept might be recommended for plaque control, along with regular maintenance at 3 monthly intervals with your dentist, or periodontist.