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4 Rogers Street
Spring Hill, QLD, 4000
Australia

+61 7 3391 2504

Brisbane Dentist - excellence in general and aesthetic dentistry with Drs Amy Daley, Leila Haywood, UQ graduates with 20 years of experience in Spring Hill, Brisbane

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dentistry life at Brisbane Smile Boutique

The life and times of our dental practice, up to date news in dentistry and celebrations, happy moments in dentistry. Our blog outlines dentistry life at Brisbane Smile Boutique in Spring Hill in inner city Brisbane

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First visit to the dentist & Child's Dental Benefits Schedule

Leila Haywood

Dental visits for kids

 

Seeing the dentist at an early age is important to make that the children's teeth and gums are healthy. 

Around 30% of preschoolers have never seen a dentist with many parents realising the benefit of having their child's teeth checked with the dentist before they’re three years old.  Around 25% of primary school aged children in Australia have tooth decay with 10% ending up needing a tooth extraction.  

Some other data indicates that one in 3 children aren't brushing their teeth twice a day. 

Tooth decay is preventable but is on the rise in Australia and affecting young children, even resulting in hospital admissions for dental treatment of severe infections.

When tooth decay is untreated it can result in chronic infection and pain, and can affect a child's growth, development and general well being. In the long term, dental disease is known to be linked with poor health, including heart disease in later life.

 

when a child should visit the dentist

It is recommended that children be taken to the dentist when the first tooth comes through or at around 1 year of age. Early visits are important to ensure that an infant's teeth and gums are healthy, and to offer support and education before tooth structure gets damaged, because it happens with time, and can not always be seen easily. Changes to routine or diet can be implemented to prevent toddlers from experiencing damage to their teeth. Some children around the age of two have been admitted to hospital with severe damage and infections in their teeth, requiring removal of their baby teeth, with statistics showing that the number in Australia is over 20 000 children requiring these kinds of treatments in a year.  

Regular checks of teeth allow issues with the teeth to be identified and addressed, and allows a dental professional the opportunity to treat issues at an early stage and to prevent complex issues developing.  

Some parents are concerned about the cost of seeing a dentist, however there are some free public dental care services available for children in Australia, and the federal Child Dental Benefits Schedule provides eligible families with $1000 worth of dental treatment over two years, which can be used for a child between the ages of 2 and 17,  to see a private dentist. This is available for families who received a parenting payment or family tax benefit Part A.

when should children brush their teeth?

Brushing twice a day, once in the morning and once in the evening before bed time, is the best way of reducing the chance of tooth decay in children.

When a baby's first tooth comes through, this should be brushed with water and a child's toothbrush. 

From the age of 18 months, a tiny dab of children's strength toothpaste can be used. Adult strength toothpaste can be used from the ages of six. It is important to brush your child's teeth until the age of 8, because children don't do it thoroughly. 

Most children lose the baby teeth around the age of 6, with the last baby tooth being lost around the age of 12. Even though the baby teeth do fall out, they need to be kept in a healthy and strong condition so a child can chew and eat properly. They also save space for the adult teeth and for the bite to line up properly. 

Most children will begin losing their primary teeth, also known as “baby” or “milk” teeth, from around the age of six. The last falls out about age 12. One in five parents indicated they thought it didn’t matter if young children got tooth decay since their baby teeth fall out anyway. 

 

children's dentist

 

Photo credit: Children's Books Daily

notes about diet?

Putting a child to bed with sweetened drinks or milky drinks is strongly linked to tooth decay and allows sugar to pool around the teeth for long periods of time. From the age of one babies should be encouraged to drink from a cup and should be put to bed after their teeth have been brushed. 

More than 90% of tap water in Australia is fluoridated, which helps to make teeth stronger and prevent tooth decay.  Most bottled water in Australia has very little to no fluoride. 

Most parents know that sugary food and drinks cause tooth decay, but more that 60% of Australian children exceed the recommendation from the World Health Organisation for sugar intake. 

The recommended maximum daily intake of added sugar for children should be no more than five teaspoons.

hi february

Leila Haywood

Well this is a sure sign that the year is well and truly underway. Dr Amy and Senior Assistant, Nikita, are heading off for an overseas getaway together with friends and family, and counting down the weeks. It really doesn't seem like too long until Easter now, now that February is coasting by. 

Here at work, we are checking in on all of our patients, and as usual making sure that their smiles are healthy and looking their best. Dr Amy and I had the privilege of caring for 3500 patients last year.

DR HAYWOOD BRISBANE FEMALE DENTIST
Dr Amy Daley Brisbane Smile Boutique aesthetic dentist
RUGBY SEASON IS COMING SOON 

RUGBY SEASON IS COMING SOON 

MOUTHGUARD season is almost here, and it is timely to mention that professional mouthguards can prevent tooth fractures, loss of teeth and even fractures of the jaw, due to their superior support and shock absorption. Professional mouthguards are custom made in most colour combinations, and take around a week to make in the laboratory. We can even make them to fit around braces, and relieve areas where adult teeth are coming through to have the mouthguard last for a longer period of time. Just make sure yours doesn't end up in the dryer, in a rubgy short pocket, like my son's seemed to.

All contact sports, where there is any chance of trauma to the teeth or face, are best played with a professional mouthguard. They are comfortable, longer lasting, don't look like chewed up pieces of plastic, fit correctly, and don't fall out. Chemist, one size fits all mouthguards might be cheap at the outset, but sometimes not in the longer run, being that their main function is to 'have a mouthguard'. They seem to be mainly for show, with no functional capacity to protect teeth, being that they don't even cover the teeth and seems to float around in mouths, and come out looking like a chewed up film of plastic.  

One case that really highlighted this was a professional rugby player in his 20's who needed both front teeth removed, a bone and gum graft for a year, and had to wear a denture for all this time. Then two implants were placed, with a new denture for 6 months, and finally I placed two implant crowns. This cost tens of thousands of dollars, not to mention the time and distress for the patient and his family. A professional mouthguard costs around $200. In the long run, they can save injuries to the teeth from impacts that may have dislodged them if not for the correct protection. 

SPORTS DRINKS DENTIST BRISBANE

It is timely to discuss how oranges, SPORTS DRINKS, soft drinks and energy drinks when playing sport, do little more than wreak havoc on the teeth, causing catastrophic and irreversible damage in lots of our young patients, especially teenagers, young adults and professional athletes, known as TOOTH EROSION.  If possible, please hydrate with water, because these drinks seem to be laden with sugar in some form, and are acidic, and even those that are sugar free are acidic, which ultimately softens the teeth.  The way we see it strip off the enamel - the hardest substance in the body - has to be seen to be believed. The enamel never grows back, and then it places a young person in a position, where their teeth are forever vulnerable to ongoing damage and sensitivity.

At the moment, I have a gentleman who is having every single tooth restored with ceramic, to build up all the missing tooth structure that has been lost and damaged, which of course takes an immense amount of time, team work, and with computer aided design we can make everything like new, except that it doesn't always last a lifetime. By far, our preference is to have no initial damage to begin with and ongoingly, so diligent home care, a healthy diet and dental checks each 6 months are an important thing to do for a lifetime of healthy teeth.

SUMMER DENTAL BRISBANE

We look forward to catching up with all our patients and friends and wish everyone the best! Please call our patient co ordinator Sonia, if the time has come to see to your SMILE and it will be our pleasure to assist. Remember that we have a no blame approach. If there's a problem, we fix it. There is no judgement here, our jobs are to help, manage and care for your dental health from the moment we meet you throughout life. We will take every measure we can possibly can to ensure that you are comfortable. 

SUMMER has been going on for what seems forever, so hopefully the weather will calm down in Brisbane sometime soon, but in the meantime, we have powerfully air conditioned rooms, as well as those beautiful views over the Brisbane River. We have yet to have a final date from council regarding the resumption of our dental premises to widen Lytton Road, so hopefully we never hear from them, and can stay here forever! 

With the best of regards

Leila Haywood / dentist / brisbane smile boutique

 

 

Farewell January!

Leila Haywood

Brisbane Dentistry Smile Boutique

Bonsoir! Well that went fast. January is almost a fleeting memory, as we venture into the year. As one might expect, it has been so far full of smiles that visit us, requesting to be checked, professionally scaled, whitened and the like.

The year is promising to be another great one for our team. Sonia, our patient co-ordinator is on reception. Nikita is the senior assistant to Dr Amy Daley, who is working Tuesday, Wednesday and Fridays from 7.30am to 3.30pm. Holly is the senior assistant to Leila Haywood, as well as her training up in 2016 and venturing into the business of beauty, which is perfect for her, given her eye for precision and style.

Christine is our dental hygienist, who attends to the magic that is Zoom technology, with transformations that impress our dentists. She has been caring for all the children who were on school holidays, starting kindy, prep, and school and the teenagers heading to high school and uni. The start of the year is the perfect time for a smile check, and everything else in between, and Christine assists our dentist to have all of our patients having the healthiest smiles possible.

Best Wishes to everyone as the year is well and truly underway, and wishing you days of happiness and sunshine.

It would be mine and Dr Amy's pleasure to be of assistance with any dental requirements. 

Kindest Regards

Leila Haywood // Dentist // Brisbane Smile Boutique

Hello Christmas

Leila Haywood

End of year is always incredibly busy for our practice, and it continues like this into the new year until February. 

Dr Leila Haywood is taking leave from the 16th December to the 9th of January. Dr Amy Daley is on holidays from the 23rd December until the 2nd of January.

Please let us know if you need an appointment prior to Christmas. The time limit for porcelain prior to the end of year is approaching. There are 2 more weeks that allow porcelain restorations to be made by our ceramist, and inserted prior to the end of 2016.

Wishing everyone the best

Best Regards 

Leila Haywood | Dentist | Brisbane Smile Boutique

Sports products and oral health

Leila Haywood

Thinning enamel makes teeth more vulnerable to decay

Thinning enamel makes teeth more vulnerable to decay

sports drinks and dentistry

Tooth decay and erosion are on the rise. At least part of this disease process is thought to be due to the increasing use of specialised sports products designed to proved nutirents and fluid during exercise. Many of these are high in carbohydrates for readily available energy and electrolytes, however many have acidic ingredients to alter the taste or prolong the shelf life. Of course the combination of sugar and acidicity is damaging to the teeth.  Sports products have been used by athletes for a long time to add to fuel stores and to promote rapid recovery of glycogen stores following exercise, but in the last few year they have been heavily marketed to he general public, and of particular concern, is their regular use by children ⚠️

 

 

Important points: 

🍭 main ingredients are carbohydrates -> sugar!  

-  Acidity is 2.4 - 4:5 

⚠️ when dehydrated the saliva dries up, and makes the teeth vulnerable to attack by sugars and acids

⚠️ rinsing a mouthguard in sports drink allows the damaging acids and sugars to pool around the teeth  

😷 people are using these as fuelling mouth rinses for short duration physical activity because it is thought that carbohydrates message the brain to delay fatigue.

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⚠️ workout supplements are promoted as an anabolic or muscle building possibility in resistance training. They are usually protein with small amounts of carbohydrate and other things like caffeine, creatine.  Most have citric or malic acid added for flavour which is damaging to the teeth. 

 

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Sports gels or lollies are easy to digest and carry, and of course the trouble occurs because they are highly concentrated sources of sugar, with many containing acid to alter the taste or to prolong the shelf life.  

 

When cosumed with sports drinks, the combination is disastrous. 

 

Some tips: 

 

💧 drink tap water for low intensity training and always for children. 

⚠️ Use sports drinks and supplements with extreme caution. 

😷 Calcium in foods might help to counteract some of the damage, and help in recovery.

 ⚠️ avoid rinsing moth guards with sports drink

💦 drink lots of water to ensure that the saliva is healthy. 

🍋 avoid acidic foods or beverages before bed

⭐️ seek the assistance of an accredited sports dietician if necessary  

⭐️ 6 monthly preventive care appointments with your dentist and dental hygienist  

 

 

 

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