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4 Rogers Street
Spring Hill, QLD, 4000
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+61 7 3391 2504

Brisbane Dentist - excellence in general and aesthetic dentistry with Drs Amy Daley, Leila Haywood, UQ graduates with 20 years of experience in Spring Hill, Brisbane

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dentistry life at Brisbane Smile Boutique

The life and times of our dental practice, up to date news in dentistry and celebrations, happy moments in dentistry. Our blog outlines dentistry life at Brisbane Smile Boutique in Spring Hill in inner city Brisbane

Filtering by Tag: east brisbane dentist

Why check ups and prevention are so important for children

Leila Haywood

PREVENTION IS STILL THE BEST TREATMENT

It's a common saying that prevention is the cure, and it is by far the best treatment in dentistry. The key focus for preventive strategies is best started for children, so that their first dental experience is a positive one, and by seeing children early on, dental staff can assist the child to practice good oral hygiene to prevent significant problems from occurring. Research indicates that 50% of children and three out of 10 adults have untreated tooth decay in Australia, which is concerning given that 90% of dental disease is preventable, with the severity and prevalence of tooth decay increasing since the mid 1990's. By reducing the sugar consumption in the diet, especially of sugary drinks, and acidic foods, and with healthy oral hygiene habits, such as tooth brushing twice a day, and flossing once a day, tooth decay can be prevented. Early childhood caries (EEC) is the number one chronic disease affecting young children, and is completely preventable. 
  
  Dental decay disease crosses all socioeconomic boundaries with high prevalence and is a significant health burden in Australia and around the world. Decay is an infectious disease that is modified by diet, and is a significant predictor of long term dental health problems and creates problems with speech, eating and poor self esteem, and therefore prevention is identified as a key priority. Healthy teeth and gums are important to a child's general health and well being, and prevention is most definitely superior to the cure. Sugar consumption is steadily rising globally, and the World Health Organisation (WHO) has issued recommendations on sugar consumption to reduce the risk of diseases in adults and children, with a specific focus on obesity and tooth decay.

CHILDRENS+DENTISTRY

Tooth decay is thought to result in dental care costs which are 5-10% of the health budgets of industrialised countries, and with oral diseases related to systemic disease, dental health is recognised as a measure of good overall health. One of the challenges with dental health is that many people believe that cavities are inevitable, with almost 100% of adults having experienced tooth decay. Studies indicate that almost half of adults forget to brush and floss before bed, and the expectation ought to be that people can keep their teeth without fillings, with the right preventive care measures, home care and observance by a dental health care provider each 6 months.

Well being

Leila Haywood

A great program being run by the Victorian government involves the release of a Well being Plan 2015 - 2019, with key priorities to improve the health and well being of the general public, and especially those who are disadvantaged. 

Oral health has been identified as a key marker of general health, and with greater levels of oral disease being inclined to be an indicator of disadvantage.

Poor diet and consumption of sugar laden drinks are contributors to poor oral health.  An improvement in oral health is enabled with access to fluoride in water and toothpaste, good dental hygiene and regular access to preventive dental care. 

The key areas of focus which are excellent guidelines are:

  • Healthier eating and being more active
  • Tobacco free living
  • Reducing alcohol and drug use, if applicable
  • Improving mental health
  • Prevention of violence and injury within the general public
wellbeing

By investing in the community and caring for individuals, it is hoped that a better sense of wellbeing and support leads to better health outcomes, happier and cared for individuals and an improvement in dental health, as well as over health and quality of life. Hopefully this preventive and advisory service will be expanded to all of Australia, for the benefit of all citizens. 

dental care and wellbeing

Caring for ourselves comes under many chapters;

Being active with at least 30 minutes of moderate activity each day. Attending to diet; eating 2 pieces of fruit each day, 5 serves of vegetables, whole grain and unprocessed/unpackaged foods, and avoiding canned foods. Minimising salt and sugar intake, and in particular decreasing or ceasing consumption of sugar laden drinks, including soft drinks, Coca Cola, energy drinks, and additions of sugar to any foods or drinks. Dental hygiene and care with twice daily brushing and daily flossing, in particular prior to bed times. The Oral B Black, Genius or Smart Series are highly recommended, with use for 2 minutes, twice a day. Difficulty flossing can be overcome with a Reach Access Flosser. Stress reduction and minimisation techniques are also critical to wellbeing, as well as a good work- life - care balance. 

A Sugar Tax?

Leila Haywood

sugar tooth

The Australian Dental Association is the peak representative body for the dental profession, and is in support of Jamie Oliver's new documentary called 'Sugar Rush',, which aired last month, and advocates a sugar tax. Sugar is playing a main role in rising global health problems. As well as causing tooth decay, excess sugar has been shown to be as dangerous as alcohol and tobacco, in causing obesity and type 2 diabetes, and foods that are high in sugar should be consumed in moderation. The problem with many snacks is that they are marketed as healthy, and being low in fat, but are actually high in sugar, including dried fruit, biscuits, fruit juice, muesli bars, flavoured popcorn and banana bread. 

Tooth decay in children has increased, and more than 50% of six year old children have experienced tooth decay in the baby teeth. Almost half have decay in their permanent teeth by the age of 12. 

Mexico 🇲🇽 introduced a 10 per cent tax on sugar sweetened beverages in 2014, which resulted in a 6 per cent decrease in the consumption of sugary drinks.  Many dentists and health professionals  are of the opinion that broader action taken by industry and the government in decreasing sugar consumption will benefit overall health of citizens. 

 

Sports products and oral health

Leila Haywood

Thinning enamel makes teeth more vulnerable to decay

Thinning enamel makes teeth more vulnerable to decay

sports drinks and dentistry

Tooth decay and erosion are on the rise. At least part of this disease process is thought to be due to the increasing use of specialised sports products designed to proved nutirents and fluid during exercise. Many of these are high in carbohydrates for readily available energy and electrolytes, however many have acidic ingredients to alter the taste or prolong the shelf life. Of course the combination of sugar and acidicity is damaging to the teeth.  Sports products have been used by athletes for a long time to add to fuel stores and to promote rapid recovery of glycogen stores following exercise, but in the last few year they have been heavily marketed to he general public, and of particular concern, is their regular use by children ⚠️

 

 

Important points: 

🍭 main ingredients are carbohydrates -> sugar!  

-  Acidity is 2.4 - 4:5 

⚠️ when dehydrated the saliva dries up, and makes the teeth vulnerable to attack by sugars and acids

⚠️ rinsing a mouthguard in sports drink allows the damaging acids and sugars to pool around the teeth  

😷 people are using these as fuelling mouth rinses for short duration physical activity because it is thought that carbohydrates message the brain to delay fatigue.

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⚠️ workout supplements are promoted as an anabolic or muscle building possibility in resistance training. They are usually protein with small amounts of carbohydrate and other things like caffeine, creatine.  Most have citric or malic acid added for flavour which is damaging to the teeth. 

 

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Sports gels or lollies are easy to digest and carry, and of course the trouble occurs because they are highly concentrated sources of sugar, with many containing acid to alter the taste or to prolong the shelf life.  

 

When cosumed with sports drinks, the combination is disastrous. 

 

Some tips: 

 

💧 drink tap water for low intensity training and always for children. 

⚠️ Use sports drinks and supplements with extreme caution. 

😷 Calcium in foods might help to counteract some of the damage, and help in recovery.

 ⚠️ avoid rinsing moth guards with sports drink

💦 drink lots of water to ensure that the saliva is healthy. 

🍋 avoid acidic foods or beverages before bed

⭐️ seek the assistance of an accredited sports dietician if necessary  

⭐️ 6 monthly preventive care appointments with your dentist and dental hygienist  

 

 

 

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Sugar Intake

Leila Haywood

Source: Women's Health  

Source: Women's Health  

How to keep your teeth and waist line healthy!! Sugar intake is the KEY for healthy teeth!! Did you know that tooth decay affects up to 92% of adults?

Make sure you're aware of these 56 other names of sugar which could be causing you tooth decay!  

Need help keeping your teeth and gums healthy, give us a call today.... 

                    07  3391  2504