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4 Rogers Street
Spring Hill, QLD, 4000
Australia

+61 7 3391 2504

Brisbane Dentist - excellence in general and aesthetic dentistry with Drs Amy Daley, Leila Haywood, UQ graduates with 20 years of experience in Spring Hill, Brisbane

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dentistry life at Brisbane Smile Boutique

The life and times of our dental practice, up to date news in dentistry and celebrations, happy moments in dentistry. Our blog outlines dentistry life at Brisbane Smile Boutique in Spring Hill in inner city Brisbane

Filtering by Tag: flosser

I HAVE NEVER USED FLOSS, DO I NEED TO?

Leila Haywood

Flossing in particular can play a key role in preventing bad breath because flossing, when done correctly, helps to remove the small particles of food that get stuck between your teeth and around your gums—those tricky places where toothbrushes can’t quite reach.

When food particles aren't removed they start to collect bacteria which can cause bad breath, and when the bacteria start to breed in between the teeth cavities can start in these hidden areas and very badly damage a tooth without being able to directly see it happening.  Dentists can find this problem on an x-ray before the tooth becomes painful.  It's a bit like an apple that looks really good on the outside, but then when we chance to have a closer looker, it has gone bad inside.  The problem with a tooth is that the core of the tooth is actually a pulp, which has nerves and blood vessels and is sterile.  When we have a cavity, the bacterial infection can allow bacteria to infiltrate the nerve, and then of course, the tooth becomes painful as it dies, and an abscess forms.

When left until the decay becomes very advanced, we need to consider whether to remove the tooth, or whether it can be saved with root canal treatment, and often a crown to support it now with the pressure of the bite.  The thing to keep in mind is that at a very early point the decay that was forming there may have been able to reversed with new remineralising tooth creams that are available, or a small filling may have been able to be placed.  When left too long though, decay in these areas shows itself with toothache, which is dull and throbbing, pus can drain through the bone, and sometimes even involves the face starting to swell up when the infection tracks into other parts of the face. I know it sounds just awful, but we do occasionally see where this happens.  Often the treatment to get a very badly damaged tooth back on track is very expensive because of the time and complex work that is needed to get the infection under control.

As well as this, in some patients their teeth become loose and wobbly, because the bacteria eat away at the jaw bone that holds the teeth in place, in a process known as periodontal disease. The bacteria can nest under the gum, and it hardens under there.  A dental hygienist, dentist or periodontist can remove the colonies when they are not too deep, but if they travel too far down the root of the tooth, or if the tooth becomes too loose, or painful, the teeth may end up having to be removed.  In fact, some people with advanced disease, end up with their teeth falling out! This disease in the jaw bone happens to around 20% of people around the world, and as yet researchers are not entirely certain as to why some people lose their teeth in this way.  

The GOOD NEWS is that we do know that daily brushing and effective flossing, 6 monthly dental examinations, professional scaling and cleaning at 6 month periods, and preventive x-rays can ensure that the supporting bone around the teeth is carefully monitored and checked.

floss

Tips for healthy gums

Leila Haywood

 

10. Your gums are made up of the soft tissue that covers the bone in your mouth, holding the teeth in place. The gums or gingiva surrounds the teeth and covers the jaw bone, creating a protective barrier.

9. Healthy gums are pink, and tough and are not painful to temperature, and pressure, and do not bleed. Bleeding and red gums is a sign of trouble. Bleeding when brushing or flossing usually indicates gum disease.

8.  There are two main types of gum disease - gingivitis and periodontitis.

Gingivitis or gum disease occurs when bacteria collects along the edges of the gum and causes an inflammation and infection of the gums and bleeding occurs.  This process is reversible once the bacteria have been removed.

Periodontitis (or periodontal disease | jaw bone disease) occurs when the bacteria gets trapped further down under the gums and causes damage and loss of the bone around the teeth. Bleeding, food trapping, gum recession or shrinking, a bad taste in the mouth and bad breath are all signs that gum disease is most likely occurring. 

7. Periodontitis effects 1 in 4 Australian adults. Tooth loss is quite often the end result. 

6. If you were able to lay your gums out flat, they would cover the same surface area as your forearm! If your gums are inflamed and infected, this is actually a large area of your body when you think about it like this.

5. The gums can recede or shrink away if you are too aggressive with your brushing. Protect your gums by using an electric toothbrush, with a pressure sensor feature. If you do use a manual toothbrush, hold the toothbrush so the bristles point at your gumline at a 45 degree angle and brush with a circular motion.

4. Dental plaque is a complex community of bacteria that begins forming again almost immediately after you have cleaned your teeth. The older and more mature plaque gets, the more damaging it becomes- releasing toxins that destroy the bone around the teeth.

3. Careful daily removal of plaque is the best way to prevent gum disease. Brush twice a day preferably Floss the teeth you wish to keep!

2. Gums can flare up during certain times of life- Hormonal fluctuations present particularly during puberty, pregnancy and menopause can lead to an increase in gingivitis. It is very important to see the dentist regularly during these times.

 1. Seeing your dentist and hygienist for preventive care will help prevent gum problems and allow us to identify any changes up before they result in possible irreversible damage.

healthy smiles

Sugar Intake

Leila Haywood

Source: Women's Health  

Source: Women's Health  

How to keep your teeth and waist line healthy!! Sugar intake is the KEY for healthy teeth!! Did you know that tooth decay affects up to 92% of adults?

Make sure you're aware of these 56 other names of sugar which could be causing you tooth decay!  

Need help keeping your teeth and gums healthy, give us a call today.... 

                    07  3391  2504

 

Celebrating Sonia's Birthday! 40 years of amazingness⭐️⭐️⭐️

Leila Haywood

East Brisbane Dentists' nurses. Happy Birthday Sonia // Blackbird Bar // Brisbane City

East Brisbane Dentists' nurses. Happy Birthday Sonia // Blackbird Bar // Brisbane City

Team  ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Team  ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Keeping Clean in Between- Why Daily Flossing is so Important

Leila Haywood

brisbane dentist

Often, when checking on how our patients' cleaning at home is going, the one thing that tends to let them down is their flossing! Most of us are great with twice daily brushing, but our flossing or in between cleaning can often get left by the wayside in our busy lives.

Which is a real shame, because even with the best brushing technique, bacteria still gets lodged and nests deep in between the teeth, where only floss can reach, causing potentially painful and costly problems like cavities and gum disease to form - and we see many of our patients develop problems in these areas. 

 

Severe Gingivitis (bleeding, inflamed gums)

Severe Gingivitis (bleeding, inflamed gums)

Decay in between the teeth caused by inadequate flossing.

Decay in between the teeth caused by inadequate flossing.

How do I floss?

brisbane dentist

Floss your teeth once a day, using a piece of floss about 30-45 cm long. Wrap around the middle finger of each hand and gently rub the floss up and down against the sides of each tooth, making sure to curve the floss into a 'c' shape to follow the surface of the tooth. Glide the floss underneath the gum, until you meet gentle resistance. This will clean the narrow spaces between the teeth where bacteria like to live.

The gums may bleed a little at first and it may be slightly uncomfortable, but this should pass as the health of the gums improves.

 

Some flossing tips-

  • Have a set time of the day that you floss- this will help you remember to do it
  • Set a reminder on your phone if you have a smart phone
  • Try using a floss handle if you find using the string floss difficult
  • Interproximal brushes (toothpick brushes) can be used in larger gaps or areas where food gets stuck if you find flossing in these areas difficult or ineffective
  • Water flossers are another alternative if you find flossing particularly difficult or have gum disease or a lot of bridgework in your mouth- speak to one of our staff about whether a water flosser is right for you.

FLOSS THE TEETH YOU WANT TO KEEP!

If you have any questions about your flossing technique, ask your dentist or hygienist at your next preventive care appointment. We will be on the lookout for any areas you may need to improve on, and will discuss these with you.