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4 Rogers Street
Spring Hill, QLD, 4000
Australia

+61 7 3391 2504

Brisbane Dentist - excellence in general and aesthetic dentistry with Drs Amy Daley, Leila Haywood, UQ graduates with 20 years of experience in Spring Hill, Brisbane

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dentistry life at Brisbane Smile Boutique

The life and times of our dental practice, up to date news in dentistry and celebrations, happy moments in dentistry. Our blog outlines dentistry life at Brisbane Smile Boutique in Spring Hill in inner city Brisbane

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Tooth brushing tips

Leila Haywood

How you BRUSH your TEETH matters a great deal, with how often you brush, how long you brush, the kind of technique and the toothbrush you use, all major influences on the effectiveness of your brushing. To gain the maximum benefit from brushing, you should brush for at least two minutes morning and night, using a soft-bristled toothbrush with a small head and a flexible neck. The advantage of these toothbrushes is that they remove the plaque and debris from your teeth without damaging your teeth and gums. It’s all in the technique.

You should clean your teeth systematically, starting at the back of your mouth with the toothbrush bristle at the gum line on a 45° angle, brushing gently in a soft and circular motion. If you scrub too hard from side to side, you can run the risk of causing your gums to recede, as well as damaging the tooth enamel. You should take care to brush carefully along the inner, outer and chewing surfaces, making sure you tip the toothbrush so you can reach the inner front areas of the teeth, which are often missed.

If limited dexterity is an issue, you might consider using a powered or electric toothbrush. They can be programmed to run for two minutes, making keeping to the correct length of brushing time easy, and the very good ones are rechargeable, with pressure sensors and they even rate your cleaning. 

Be sure to change your toothbrush or toothbrush head every 3 months or as soon as the bristles bend.

toothbrushing tips

TOP TIPS

1.  Brush for 2 minutes morning and night

2. Use a soft toothbrush with a small head, or better still an electric toothbrush that is rechargeable with a pressure sensor and timer

3. Don't push too hard

4. Brush in a soft circular motion

5. Change the toothbrush or electric toothbrush head each 3 months

6. Keep your tooth brush upright so the bristles can dry, move it away form the basin where it might get splashed

7. Use a remineralising toothpaste that has calcium, phosphate and fluoride


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First visit to the dentist & Child's Dental Benefits Schedule

Leila Haywood

Dental visits for kids

 

Seeing the dentist at an early age is important to make that the children's teeth and gums are healthy. 

Around 30% of preschoolers have never seen a dentist with many parents realising the benefit of having their child's teeth checked with the dentist before they’re three years old.  Around 25% of primary school aged children in Australia have tooth decay with 10% ending up needing a tooth extraction.  

Some other data indicates that one in 3 children aren't brushing their teeth twice a day. 

Tooth decay is preventable but is on the rise in Australia and affecting young children, even resulting in hospital admissions for dental treatment of severe infections.

When tooth decay is untreated it can result in chronic infection and pain, and can affect a child's growth, development and general well being. In the long term, dental disease is known to be linked with poor health, including heart disease in later life.

 

when a child should visit the dentist

It is recommended that children be taken to the dentist when the first tooth comes through or at around 1 year of age. Early visits are important to ensure that an infant's teeth and gums are healthy, and to offer support and education before tooth structure gets damaged, because it happens with time, and can not always be seen easily. Changes to routine or diet can be implemented to prevent toddlers from experiencing damage to their teeth. Some children around the age of two have been admitted to hospital with severe damage and infections in their teeth, requiring removal of their baby teeth, with statistics showing that the number in Australia is over 20 000 children requiring these kinds of treatments in a year.  

Regular checks of teeth allow issues with the teeth to be identified and addressed, and allows a dental professional the opportunity to treat issues at an early stage and to prevent complex issues developing.  

Some parents are concerned about the cost of seeing a dentist, however there are some free public dental care services available for children in Australia, and the federal Child Dental Benefits Schedule provides eligible families with $1000 worth of dental treatment over two years, which can be used for a child between the ages of 2 and 17,  to see a private dentist. This is available for families who received a parenting payment or family tax benefit Part A.

when should children brush their teeth?

Brushing twice a day, once in the morning and once in the evening before bed time, is the best way of reducing the chance of tooth decay in children.

When a baby's first tooth comes through, this should be brushed with water and a child's toothbrush. 

From the age of 18 months, a tiny dab of children's strength toothpaste can be used. Adult strength toothpaste can be used from the ages of six. It is important to brush your child's teeth until the age of 8, because children don't do it thoroughly. 

Most children lose the baby teeth around the age of 6, with the last baby tooth being lost around the age of 12. Even though the baby teeth do fall out, they need to be kept in a healthy and strong condition so a child can chew and eat properly. They also save space for the adult teeth and for the bite to line up properly. 

Most children will begin losing their primary teeth, also known as “baby” or “milk” teeth, from around the age of six. The last falls out about age 12. One in five parents indicated they thought it didn’t matter if young children got tooth decay since their baby teeth fall out anyway. 

 

children's dentist

 

Photo credit: Children's Books Daily

notes about diet?

Putting a child to bed with sweetened drinks or milky drinks is strongly linked to tooth decay and allows sugar to pool around the teeth for long periods of time. From the age of one babies should be encouraged to drink from a cup and should be put to bed after their teeth have been brushed. 

More than 90% of tap water in Australia is fluoridated, which helps to make teeth stronger and prevent tooth decay.  Most bottled water in Australia has very little to no fluoride. 

Most parents know that sugary food and drinks cause tooth decay, but more that 60% of Australian children exceed the recommendation from the World Health Organisation for sugar intake. 

The recommended maximum daily intake of added sugar for children should be no more than five teaspoons.

Why check ups and prevention are so important for children

Leila Haywood

PREVENTION IS STILL THE BEST TREATMENT

It's a common saying that prevention is the cure, and it is by far the best treatment in dentistry. The key focus for preventive strategies is best started for children, so that their first dental experience is a positive one, and by seeing children early on, dental staff can assist the child to practice good oral hygiene to prevent significant problems from occurring. Research indicates that 50% of children and three out of 10 adults have untreated tooth decay in Australia, which is concerning given that 90% of dental disease is preventable, with the severity and prevalence of tooth decay increasing since the mid 1990's. By reducing the sugar consumption in the diet, especially of sugary drinks, and acidic foods, and with healthy oral hygiene habits, such as tooth brushing twice a day, and flossing once a day, tooth decay can be prevented. Early childhood caries (EEC) is the number one chronic disease affecting young children, and is completely preventable. 
  
  Dental decay disease crosses all socioeconomic boundaries with high prevalence and is a significant health burden in Australia and around the world. Decay is an infectious disease that is modified by diet, and is a significant predictor of long term dental health problems and creates problems with speech, eating and poor self esteem, and therefore prevention is identified as a key priority. Healthy teeth and gums are important to a child's general health and well being, and prevention is most definitely superior to the cure. Sugar consumption is steadily rising globally, and the World Health Organisation (WHO) has issued recommendations on sugar consumption to reduce the risk of diseases in adults and children, with a specific focus on obesity and tooth decay.

CHILDRENS+DENTISTRY

Tooth decay is thought to result in dental care costs which are 5-10% of the health budgets of industrialised countries, and with oral diseases related to systemic disease, dental health is recognised as a measure of good overall health. One of the challenges with dental health is that many people believe that cavities are inevitable, with almost 100% of adults having experienced tooth decay. Studies indicate that almost half of adults forget to brush and floss before bed, and the expectation ought to be that people can keep their teeth without fillings, with the right preventive care measures, home care and observance by a dental health care provider each 6 months.

Seadeck fun

Leila Haywood

dental team brisbane
brisbane river dental
senior dental nurse brisbane
our dental hygienist
dr Amy daley and Nikita
Sonia and Holly
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Child Dental Benefits Schedule increased

Leila Haywood

girl-brushing-teeth

The Australian Dental Association has been advocating for restoration of the cap on dental treatment and care that is available to eligible children. In December last year, with support of Labor and the Greens, the Government announced that the CDBS would be retained, but that it would be reduced from $1000 to $700 over 2 years. 

Urgent discussions with the Federal Health minister, along with support from  key Senators who were opposed to the cuts to the Child Dental Benefits Schedule cap, have resulted in the Australian Government advising that the original figure of $1000 will be reinstated. 

The reduction to $700 would have resulted in 25% of children who have accessed the program, not being in a position have had their treatment needs met. Dental disease in children is on the rise, which 40% of children aged 5 to 10 having decay in their baby teeth, and 30% of children aged 9-14 having decay in their permanent teeth. A reduction in the ability to provide oral health care and preventive strategies for these children and their families is bad news. 

Today's decision by the Health minister ensures that the CDBS remains a critically important investment in the dental health of disadvantaged Australian children to help these children access the care and assistance that they need for a healthy life, with their private dentist of choice. As a community service, our dental professionals will bulk bill for eligible children for their dental care.